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Tesoro Cortés

Tesoro Cortés
Tesoro Cortés Tesoro Cortés Tesoro Cortés
Brand: Tesoro
Product Code: Tesoro Cortés Metal Detector
Availability: In Stock
Price: $722.00
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Tesoro Cortes Metal Detector with 9x8" Concentric Search Coil

 

The Cortés represents the best combination of current and new technologies that Tesoro has to offer. When Jack Gifford and Vince Gifford set out to create a new target ID machine they each brought with them different experience. Jack has over twenty-five years experience designing some of the best analog detectors that have been on the market. Vince brought with him a decade of computer systems experience. Together, they have been creating new technology that gives our detectors superior performance and keeps them easy to use. Various parts of this technology have been finding it's way into Tesoro detectors since the introduction of the Golden µMax. The new Cortés represents all phases of our new microprocessor technology combined with our tried and true analog circuits to create a detector that has all of the high end features our customers have asked for with user friendly Tesoro controls.

The first thing that you will notice is the control box and battery holder configuration. The µMax housing was just not big enough to hold the new circuit board so we moved the batteries down under the arm bracket and increased the size of the box slightly. This allows us to use a 12 volt system to work with the demands of the target ID circuitry. It also gave us the ability to put a 2¼" speaker on the Cortés. This will give better and louder target signals in the field.

The Cortés' 2x16 character LCD display will catch your eye as well. This area is the information center of the detector. The top row is an alpha/numeric display that gives a broad indication of your possible target. One of five different categories are displayed. Also if the target is overdriving the circuits, the display will tell you to lift the coil for a more accurate reading. The alpha/numeric and bar graph section of the display will remain blank until the coil passes over a target. After the detectorist has decided to dig or ignore the target the display will clear itself after six seconds of not receiving a signal. The display works in all modes, regardless of the discrimination setting. By clearing the display after six seconds the user is able to tell if has passed over a new target that may have been discriminated out. The detector may not produce an audio signal, but the display will show a target reading. The detectorist then has the choice to either go back and check the target or ignore it.

The bottom half of the display contains the real nuts and bolts information that will help you to work the Cortés to its fullest extent. The far right hand part of the display is a battery level indicator. This gives an accurate measure of your current battery level. On the far left-hand side is the probable depth indicator. The Cortés uses the phase shift of the target to determine the probable target and then looks at the amplitude of the signal to determine the depth. For example: a nickel and a quarter are in the ground and the quarter is deeper than the nickel; if we just went off of amplitude change, the detector may read the two targets as being the same depth. However, the Cortés would show the quarter as being deeper because its phase shift response is different than that of the nickel.

In the center of the lower display is a nine segment bar graph display. The different segments represent the following possible targets: iron; foil: nickel; round tab; square tab; zinc penny; copper penny and dime; quarter; half and dollar. The graph shows what the coil saw during the entire sweep of the coil. The targets metal composition and orientation in the ground can cause "smearing" or possible indication in more than one graph segment. For example: pull tabs usually will not respond in a single segment but give signals in two or three segments. To help the detectorist decide on the target, we have also included an ID Number display next to the bar graph.

The ID Number takes the largest part of the signal and converts it to a two digit number. When Vince put together the scale for the ID Number, he decided to put the most resolution in the middle range of targets. This is the area where nickels, pull tabs and gold rings lie. We know that iron will always be on the low end of the scale and silver coins and jewelry will always be on the high end. So iron targets will always give a reading of 0 and silver will always give a reading of 95. The Cortés now gives you the ability to decide what you want to dig. One of the hardest parts of designing detectors is the fact that pull tabs can vary from place to place. But a hunter working in the same area can use the ID Number to learn the characteristics of the local pull tabs and effectively ignore them.

For those detectorists that prefer a notch filter discrimination, we have also added a simple flip switch to activate either a narrow or wide notch window. When the display is blanked, two "N"s or three "W"s will appear on the screen. The N will indicate a narrow notch window and will be in the round tab and square tab portion of the graph segments. The wide notch window will cause a W to be in the round tab, square tab and zinc penny segments. These indications are an easy way to check what part of the scale is being notched out. The notch indicators will only show when there is no target under the coil. When there is a target signal, no matter if the target has been discriminated or not, the display will show the information of the target.

The Sum mode is another feature to help identify targets. While the detector is in either the Discriminate or All Metal mode, the display shows the target information from the entire sweep of the coil. Each time the coil passes over the target the microprocessor generates a new target ID reading. While this is nice for general searching, it can be confusing while pinpointing. This is where the Sum mode becomes useful. Pushing the springloaded switch into the Sum mode causes the detector to start a multi-tone ID and averages all of the coil passes over the target. The tone ID has nine different tones and relates directly to the bar graph segments. The higher up on the graph the target is, the higher the pitch of the audio signal. Averaging the coil passes over the target gives the detectorist the ability to get rid of most of the signal noise that prevents making an accurate target identification. Here's how it works: when the detectorist gets a target signal that he wishes to check out, he pushes and holds the Mode switch in the Sum position. Shortening his coil sweep to only a two or four inch sweep he passes the coil over the target three to seven times. The short multiple sweeps give the microprocessor the chance to sum the passes and average them. During the sweeps the audio ID will start at the lowest signal and will get progressively higher in pitch until there is no more change. When this happens the detector is giving the most accurate ID possible. Then the user can decide if he wants to dig or ignore the target.

All of these new features are complimented by Tesoro's easy to use controls. No touch pads or scroll through menus. Set the detector how you like it by adjusting the knobs on the front of the machine. The Cortés features an On/Off Sensitivity knob; a Discriminate Level knob; a Manual Ground Balance knob; a Mode Switch with All Metal, Discriminate and Sum mode settings; a Notch Width switch with Off, Narrow and Wide settings and a Light switch to control the LCD backlight with a High, Low, and Off positions.

The Cortés fits into a package that weighs just less than three pounds (including the batteries!) and is covered under Tesoro's Lifetime Warranty. The Tesoro Cortés makes target ID easy and fun. Contact your local dealer or the factory for more information.

SPECIFICATIONS
Operating Frequency 10 kHz
Searchcoil Type Concentric
Searchcoil Size 9 x 8
Searchcoil Family Epsilon
Cable Length Approx. 3'
Audio Freq. Target ID Tones Approx. 350 to 800 Hz
Audio Freq. All Metal VCO Approx. 350 to 920 Hz
Audio Output 2 ¼" speaker and headphone jack
Headphone Compatibility ¼" stereo plug
Weight (may vary slightly) 2.98 lbs
Battery Requirement Eight AA (alkaline)
Battery Life (typical) 10 to 20 hours
Optimum Temp. Range 30° to 100° F
Optimum Humidity 0 to 75% R.H.
Operating Modes Silent Search Discriminate
No Motion All Metal
Sum
Notch Narrow/Wide
GETTING STARTED - UNPACKING THE BOX

Your Cortés was shipped with these parts:

1 Upper Pole Assembly

Fully assembled, including upper pole stem with handle grip, padded arm bracket and control housing.

1 Middle Pole Assembly With Pole Lock

1 ABS Lower Pole Assembly

Fully assembled, complete with two friction washers, mounting screw, and thumb nut.

1 9 x 8 Concentric Searchcoil With 3’ Cable

2 Battery Packs, Each With 4 AA Batteries

1 Operator Instruction Manual

1 Tesoro Warranty Card

If any of these items are missing, contact the Tesoro Authorized Dealer where you purchased your detector immediately.

 

Assembling the Cortés is simple and requires no special tools. Just install the battery packs, mount the searchcoil on the lower pole assembly, connect the pole assemblies together, wrap the excess cable around the pole and plug the cable into the control housing. Finally, adjust the pole length and searchcoil angle and you're ready!


INSTALLING THE BATTERY

The Cortés is powered by 8 AA batteries divided into 2 compartments, which are located in the armrest housing.

Open the battery compartment under the armrest by gently grasping the bottom edge of the door and pulling outward and upwards. (The door is hinged at the top.)

 

Remove the batteries by pressing down on the right side of the 4-pack battery holder so that the left side of the holder will pop up. Pull out the holder and replace the batteries as needed.

When returning the holder, note the position of the spring clips inside the armrest housing and make sure that the battery pack contacts fit snugly against the springs. Insert the side with the contacts first and then press down on the left edge of the battery holder to reseat the holder.

Snap compartment cover to close.

ASSEMBLING YOUR DETECTOR
  1. On the lower pole assembly, remove the mounting screw and thumb nut from the pole tip.
  2. Insert the pole tip between the mounting ears of the searchcoil and align the holes of the pole tip and washers with those of the mounting ears.
    Note: The pole tip should fit very snugly into the mounting ears.
  3. Insert the mounting screw through the holes in the mounting ears and pole tip—entering from the side opposite the cable connection.
  4. Install the thumb nut on the mounting screw and tighten by hand. 
    Note: Do not overtighten the thumb nut. It should be snug but not too difficult to loosen up.
  5. On the middle pole assembly, depress the two spring buttons and slide the middle pole assembly into the upper pole assembly until the spring buttons click into the holes, thus locking the two assemblies into place. Tighten the pole lock to secure the two assemblies together.
  6. Slide lower pole into middle pole until the spring buttons click into the first set of adjustment holes. Turn pole lock to tighten, thus locking the assembly into place.
  7. Wrap the cable around the pole leaving enough slack near the searchcoil to permit searchcoil adjustment.
    Note: Do not allow the cable to flop loosely over the searchcoil. Since the detector is sensitive enough to “see” the tiny wires in the cable, a floppy cable can cause false signals as the searchcoil senses the moving wires.
  8. Plug the male cable end into the female connector on the control housing and tighten the cable thumb nut. You are finished!
    Note: You will want to adjust the pole length and the searchcoil angle to your preference.

ADJUSTING THE POLE & SEARCHCOIL

 

The pole length should be adjusted so that the detector does not become uncomfortable or tiring after long periods of use. The detector grip should rest in your hand with your arm relaxed, your elbow straight but not locked, with the pole extending out in front of you at the approximate angle shown in the photo.

You should be able to swing the detector back and forth in front of you—using relaxed shoulder movement—while keeping the searchcoil as close to the ground as possible. This swinging movement is often called a “sweep.”

The searchcoil should not touch the ground during your sweep. The pole length should be adjusted to allow this without having to lift the detector with your elbow or shoulder. The searchcoil should rest about one inch above the ground while you are standing erect. The angle of the searchcoil should allow the bottom to be parallel to the ground.

The pole length is adjusted by loosening the pole lock, then depressing the spring buttons and extending or shortening the pole until the spring buttons click into the set of holes that give you the most comfortable pole length.

To adjust the searchcoil angle, simply loosen the searchcoil thumb nut slightly and move the searchcoil into the desired position. Tighten the searchcoil thumb nut by hand so that the searchcoil will hold in place.

 


QUICKSTART - SELF-GUIDED TUTORIAL

The Quickstart is designed to teach you how to use your new Cortés. It provides a quick and easy means of learning your detector and the concepts behind all of the functions.

You will need the following items:

  1. Your fully assembled Cortés.
  2. An iron target (a small nail or screw will do), an iron washer, a nickel, a zinc penny (1982 or later), a quarter and a couple of different pull tabs.
  3. A nonmetal table top or counter.

Here’s what you will do:

  1. Check Display Readings in DISC Mode
  2. Adjust SENSITIVITY
  3. Perform Air Test in DISC Mode
  4. Perform Air Test in NOTCH Mode
  5. Perform Air Test in SUM Mode
  6. Adjust THRESHOLD
  7. Adjust GROUND BALANCE for Air Test
  8. Perform Air Test in ALL METAL Mode
  9. Check Back Light Levels
Prepare for the Quickstart

Place your assembled Cortés on the nonmetal surface. Make sure that there are no metal objects near the coil and remove any jewelry from your hands and wrists.

 

Start with the controls like this:

  1. THRESHOLD, SENSITIVITY and DISCRIMINATE LEVEL knobs turned completely counterclockwise.
  2. MODE, NOTCH and LIGHT switches in the center position.
  3. GROUND BALANCE knob in the 12 o’clock position.
Check Display Readings in DISC Mode

Turn the SENSITIVITY knob from OFF to about 2-3. You will hear a quick beep followed by a slight hum that will fade away. This is the detector letting you know that it has been turned on and is ready to go.

The Tesoro Cortés is a Target Identification Detector or T.I.D. The most important feature is the 2 by 16 character display found on the upper half of the detector faceplate. At this time the only thing that should be displayed on your screen is the battery level indicator in the lower right corner and the word DISCRIMINATE. The battery level is a continuous test of the condition of your battery. The indicator will read like a fuel gauge. As the batteries get lower, the bar dips lower. When the bar becomes very small, it is time to change your batteries.

 

Pass any target over the coil and read the meter. The information is unimportant at this moment. After about 6 to 10 seconds the screen will clear and the word DISCRIMINATE will appear again. The Cortés will clear the display screen after that amount of time so you will be able to visually see a target even if you do not get an audio response. You may want to take some time to try this out.

As you were waving the targets, you will have noticed that the display has several areas that contain different pieces of information. All of the different segments will be used together to determine the most likely identification of the target while it is still in the ground. As you are practicing, please note that different distances from the coil, orientation of the target, and width of the sweeps or passes over the coil may produce a variety of slightly distinct display readings.

NOTE: A target identification detector is never 100% accurate. If you get a strong, positive audio signal when hunting, dig it, no matter what the display shows. Digging the good audio/bad display target will result in better finds over the long run than ignoring those signals.

The top row of the display shows the target data in the broadest strokes. All targets will fall into one of four categories: Iron or Foil; Nickel, Pull Tab, Ring; Zinc Penny, Screw Cap; Silver Coin, Copper Penny. This brief information will lead you to the bottom row that contains much more detailed data.

Starting from the bottom left-hand corner of the display, you will find the COIN DEPTH indicator. This section will let you know the approximate depth of the target. In the center of the bottom row is a nine segment bar graph. It will show all of the information the detector saw during the entire coil sweep. Full sweep data information is helpful in determining possible treasure/trash masking and odd-shaped iron. Between the graph and the battery indicator is the ID NUMBER. The ID Number shows the peak part of the signal as a two digit number from 0 to 95. Iron reads as 0 and copper and silver coins read 95. All other targets will read somewhere in between. Take some time to try all of your targets and notice the different readings that you get. The best distance from the coil is somewhere between 4 and 8 inches. If you get closer, you will notice the detector will read LIFT COIL. Moving the target away from the coil slightly will result in a more accurate reading.

Below are some of the possible readings from various targets. These are not exact and your machine may read slightly different.

Small Iron Target (Screw or Nail): You may not get an audio signal depending on the target size and shape. However, you will get a meter reading.

 

Iron Washer or Odd-Shaped Iron: Odd-shaped iron or iron with holes in it can fool many machines. As it starts to pass under the coil, it may look like a coin. But as it nears the center of the coil, its signal shifts to the more traditional iron signal. Notice the two illustrations below. In the first, the top row reads iron or foil, the bar graph has some peaks in the coin range and the ID number reads 0. In the second, the top row reads zinc cent, screw cap, there is nothing in the bar graph and the ID number reads 88.

 

The thing that both of these illustrations have in common is that the various segments of the display do not "agree" with each other. This is a sure sign that you are detecting an odd-shaped piece of iron. Notice on the rest of the illustrations that the bar graph and the ID number show about the same information. When the ID number and the graph "agree," you can be sure that your Cortés is receiving a clean signal.

 

Adjust SENSITIVITY

The all metal circuit uses a single channel to detect various metals. The discriminate circuit uses two different channels, then amplifies and filters them. The detector will then compare the signals and determine whether or not to beep at the target. While there is a great advantage to ignoring unwanted targets, it can make the circuitry more susceptible to interference. A number of outside conditions such as power lines, highly mineralized soil, and wet salt sand can cause interference.

The SENSITIVITY knob is used to raise or lower the power to the operational amplifiers, which changes the gain. Gain is a measurement of how much a signal is amplified. The higher the gain the more depth and sensitivity to small objects a detector has. Unfortunately, any small interference that is amplified can cause the detector to become erratic. The SENSITIVITY control is used to find the best gain setting in any location without letting the detector become unstable.

The SENSITIVITY knob is numbered from MIN to 10 and then has an orange area called the Max Boost Zone. For normal hunting, anywhere in the numbered zone will work very well. However, the Max Boost will allow you to increase the power to the operational amplifiers to the point of overload. This may cause your detector to become unstable and force you to turn the SENSITIVITY knob to a lower setting. An overload situation will not hurt your detector, but it will maximize the gain that is used by your detector. This can, in certain conditions such as low mineralization in the soil, cause your detector to penetrate deeper into the ground and become more sensitive to small targets.

Take some time to try waving targets in front of the coil with different sensitivity settings. Notice that the higher the sensitivity setting, the farther away from the coil that a target can be and still respond with an audio signal.

Perform Air Test in DISC Mode

As discussed before, the Discriminate Mode is used to filter unwanted targets from good targets. The principle behind this is pretty simple. The detector sends out a signal and then receives it back creating a small electronic field. As metal passes through the field that the detector generates, it causes a change in the received signal. The amount of change that each type of metal causes is fairly constant; therefore, we can tune our detectors to miss targets that we don’t want to find. The change is based on the type of conductivity that each target has. The general list of conductive targets is as follows: iron, foil, nickels, gold jewelry, pull tabs, screw tabs, pennies and silver coins starting with dimes and working up to silver dollars. This is very easy to visualize using the bar graph. This list is meant to be a guide only. There is a point that some pull tabs, nickels and gold jewelry overlap. Also, the depth of the target and its orientation in the ground can change the received signal. A coin that is flat to the coil will produce a better signal than a coin that is on edge. Take some time to try different combinations of depths and orientation of your targets and find out how your detector responds.

We are now ready to discriminate targets from each other. We will start with the DISCRIMINATE LEVEL at MIN. Please notice that the DISCRIMINATE LEVEL knob has words that correspond to the items that are discriminated out. While performing the Air Test, notice that your Cortés will continue to display target data for items that do not respond with an audio signal.

All of your targets except the small iron should respond with a good audio signal at the MIN setting. Next, we will turn the DISCRIMINATE LEVEL up to the 5¢ setting. This level is high enough to knock out the nickel. At this time the iron target and the nickel should give no response, while most of the pull tabs, the zinc penny, and the quarter will give a solid response. The iron washer may fall out at some point or may give a choppy signal all the way up to MAX. But reading the display should give you the indication that it is odd-shaped iron. Next, turn the DISCRIMINATE LEVEL knob just past the PULL TAB marking. At this time most or all of the pull tabs should not give any audio signal. The zinc penny and the quarter should give a strong signal. Now roll the DISCRIMINATE LEVEL all the way to MAX. Notice that the penny has stopped responding and only the quarter is still responding. The discrimination will not go high enough to lose most of the silver coins.

This Air Test was designed to show you quickly how your Discriminate Mode works. Each machine may be a little different from all of the others, so you may want to take some time and try different targets to find responses of your machine. At a later date, you may want to build a test garden to test your detector in the field.

Perform Air Test in NOTCH Mode

There is a very distinct difference between the regular Discriminate and the Notch Filter Discriminate. While both filter out unwanted targets, the regular Discriminate Level knocks out everything below the level it was set at. The Notch Filter Discriminate works only in a certain band and does not affect the targets below or above it. This gives the detector the advantage of discriminating most of the pull tabs and still keeping nickels and gold rings. The Notch Filter Discriminate has two settings—Narrow and Wide. Narrow covers most pull tabs and Wide covers most pull tabs and most screw caps.

Turn the DISCRIMINATE LEVEL down to MIN. Please remember that the regular Discriminate will override the Notch Filter Discriminate. The best settings when using the Notch Filter Discriminate is to have the DISCRIMINATE LEVEL set just high enough to knock out small iron and foil and use the NOTCH switch to define the width of the Notch window.

Flip the NOTCH switch to either NAR. (Narrow) or WIDE. The N will indicate a narrow notch window and will be in the round tab and square tab portion of the graph segments. The wide notch window will cause a W to be in the round tab, square tab and zinc penny segments.

 

These indications are an easy way to check what part of the scale is being notched out. The notch indicators will only show when there is no target under the coil. When there is a target signal, no matter if the target has been discriminated or not, the display will show the information of the target. Take some time to try various targets and note the response. When you are done, flip the NOTCH switch back into the center position before moving to the next section of the quick start.

NOTE: No detector can guarantee to discriminate out all of the pull tabs and respond to all of the gold rings. The Cortés has two different notch positions to knock out the most common trash targets. Only the user can determine the right amount of Notch Filter Discrimination that is correct for his/her hunting style and local environment.

Perform Air Test in SUM Mode

The Sum Mode is a feature that can help identify targets. While the detector is in either the Discriminate or All Metal Mode, the display shows the target information from the entire sweep of the coil. Each time the coil passes over the target, the microprocessor generates a new target ID reading. While this is nice for general searching, it can be confusing while pinpointing. This is where the Sum Mode becomes useful. Pushing the springloaded switch into the Sum Mode causes the detector to start a multi-tone ID and averages all of the coil passes over the target. The tone ID has nine different tones and relates directly to the bar graph segments. The higher up on the graph the target is, the higher the pitch of the audio signal. Averaging the coil passes over the target gives the detectorist the ability to get rid of most of the signal noise that prevents making an accurate target identification.

 

Start by waving targets across both the outer and inner rings of your 9x8 coil. Notice that you are hearing a single frequency audio tone and that the display may change. Now push the MODE Switch to the SUM position and let go. The switch should spring back to the center position. The SUM Mode is a momentary position only. In the SUM Mode, you will want to shorten your coil sweep down to about 2" to 4". You will be able to duplicate this by waving your target over the inner ring of your 9x8 coil only. Shortening the coil sweep helps to eliminate unwanted ground noise in the field.

Now push and hold the MODE Switch into the SUM position. As you wave your targets, you will notice the audio signal starts out with a low tone and will shift as the Cortés averages the coil sweeps. After 4 to 7 sweeps, the tone should stop shifting and the display will show the most accurate data available.

Take some time to check all of your targets and notice the different tones and practice shortening your target sweeps.

Adjust Threshold

Flip the MODE Switch to the farthest right-hand position. This will put your Cortés into the ALL METAL Mode. The All Metal Mode is used to help pinpoint and handle highly mineralized ground. The Cortés uses a factory preset ground balance in the DISCRIMINATE Mode. This will work fine for most hunting conditions, but some areas may have a high enough mineral content to cause a loss of depth and sensitivity. The ALL METAL Mode and its adjustable ground balance was designed to allow you to work in those tougher conditions.

 

To adjust the threshold tone, turn the THRESHOLD knob clockwise until you hear a slight but steady tone. You will have to turn the knob to somewhere between the 10 o’clock and 1 o’clock position to get the best hum.

The purpose of the threshold tone is to give a reference to judge targets for pinpointing and to adjust the ground balance. (For more information on ground balancing, see the "Adjust GROUND BALANCE for Air Test" section below and the "Ground Balancing in the Field" section.)

In the field, some targets may be small enough or deep enough that they will not be able to generate an audio signal by themselves. By monitoring a threshold tone, you already have a threshold tone so changes are easier to hear. However, if the threshold is set too soft or too loud, small changes in the signal will be hard to hear. Take some time and find a threshold level that is right for you.

Adjust GROUND BALANCE for Air Test

The ground balance function for your Cortés is a form of discrimination that allows you to tune out the mineralization in the ground that may mask targets or decrease the detector's depth and sensitivity. The GROUND BALANCE knob is on a 3 and ¾ turn potentiometer. While the knob will turn endlessly in either direction, when the knob is at the end of its range, a slight drag will be felt while turning.

NOTE: The following procedure is for the Air Test only. For directions on ground balancing your Cortés in the field, see the "Ground Balancing in the Field" section.

To set the GROUND BALANCE knob for the Air Test, turn the knob 5 turns counterclockwise and then turn the knob 2 turns clockwise. This will make sure the GROUND BALANCE knob is just slightly above the middle part of its range. No further turns will be needed for the Air Test.

Perform Air Test in ALL METAL Mode

Once you have set the correct threshold hum and adjusted the ground balance, you are ready to perform an Air Test in the ALL METAL Mode. Your Cortés has a VCO-style ALL METAL Mode. You will find that as targets get closer to the coil, the threshold tone will get louder and higher in pitch.

Try waving your targets in front of the coil. Start from a distance of 10 to 12 inches away from the coil and slowly work your way closer to the coil. Then try starting from 6 inches away from the left or right of your coil and work your way to the center of the coil. Notice the changes of the audio signal.

 

Your strongest signal will always be closest to the center of the coil. Additional information can also be learned by the signal strength and pitch. A smaller or deeper target will give a less noticeable change in the threshold than a larger or more shallow target will give. Take some time and try all of your targets at different depths to find out how your detector sounds.

Check Back Light Levels

The Cortés has a back lighting system so that you will be able to hunt in darkened conditions. To check the back light levels, shade the display with your cupped hand or turn down the light in the room that you are in. Flip the LIGHT switch from the center position to either the LOW or HIGH position. You should see the display light up. Make sure that you return the LIGHT switch to the center position when you are done using the back light.

NOTE: Using the LIGHT feature will cause your batteries to drain much faster than during regular use. The Low Level draws less current than the High and will not drain your batteries as quickly.

Conclusion

Congratulations, you have just finished the Quickstart for your new Cortés detector and in the process have learned quite a lot about your detector. But experience is the best teacher. I would recommend that you get out and practice with your detector as much as possible. Any time spent using your detector will give you valuable experience.

OPERATING TECHNIQUES

Ground Balancing In The Field

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Description

Tesoro Cortes Metal Detector with 9x8" Concentric Search Coil

 

The Cortés represents the best combination of current and new technologies that Tesoro has to offer. When Jack Gifford and Vince Gifford set out to create a new target ID machine they each brought with them different experience. Jack has over twenty-five years experience designing some of the best analog detectors that have been on the market. Vince brought with him a decade of computer systems experience. Together, they have been creating new technology that gives our detectors superior performance and keeps them easy to use. Various parts of this technology have been finding it's way into Tesoro detectors since the introduction of the Golden µMax. The new Cortés represents all phases of our new microprocessor technology combined with our tried and true analog circuits to create a detector that has all of the high end features our customers have asked for with user friendly Tesoro controls.

The first thing that you will notice is the control box and battery holder configuration. The µMax housing was just not big enough to hold the new circuit board so we moved the batteries down under the arm bracket and increased the size of the box slightly. This allows us to use a 12 volt system to work with the demands of the target ID circuitry. It also gave us the ability to put a 2¼" speaker on the Cortés. This will give better and louder target signals in the field.

The Cortés' 2x16 character LCD display will catch your eye as well. This area is the information center of the detector. The top row is an alpha/numeric display that gives a broad indication of your possible target. One of five different categories are displayed. Also if the target is overdriving the circuits, the display will tell you to lift the coil for a more accurate reading. The alpha/numeric and bar graph section of the display will remain blank until the coil passes over a target. After the detectorist has decided to dig or ignore the target the display will clear itself after six seconds of not receiving a signal. The display works in all modes, regardless of the discrimination setting. By clearing the display after six seconds the user is able to tell if has passed over a new target that may have been discriminated out. The detector may not produce an audio signal, but the display will show a target reading. The detectorist then has the choice to either go back and check the target or ignore it.

The bottom half of the display contains the real nuts and bolts information that will help you to work the Cortés to its fullest extent. The far right hand part of the display is a battery level indicator. This gives an accurate measure of your current battery level. On the far left-hand side is the probable depth indicator. The Cortés uses the phase shift of the target to determine the probable target and then looks at the amplitude of the signal to determine the depth. For example: a nickel and a quarter are in the ground and the quarter is deeper than the nickel; if we just went off of amplitude change, the detector may read the two targets as being the same depth. However, the Cortés would show the quarter as being deeper because its phase shift response is different than that of the nickel.

In the center of the lower display is a nine segment bar graph display. The different segments represent the following possible targets: iron; foil: nickel; round tab; square tab; zinc penny; copper penny and dime; quarter; half and dollar. The graph shows what the coil saw during the entire sweep of the coil. The targets metal composition and orientation in the ground can cause "smearing" or possible indication in more than one graph segment. For example: pull tabs usually will not respond in a single segment but give signals in two or three segments. To help the detectorist decide on the target, we have also included an ID Number display next to the bar graph.

The ID Number takes the largest part of the signal and converts it to a two digit number. When Vince put together the scale for the ID Number, he decided to put the most resolution in the middle range of targets. This is the area where nickels, pull tabs and gold rings lie. We know that iron will always be on the low end of the scale and silver coins and jewelry will always be on the high end. So iron targets will always give a reading of 0 and silver will always give a reading of 95. The Cortés now gives you the ability to decide what you want to dig. One of the hardest parts of designing detectors is the fact that pull tabs can vary from place to place. But a hunter working in the same area can use the ID Number to learn the characteristics of the local pull tabs and effectively ignore them.

For those detectorists that prefer a notch filter discrimination, we have also added a simple flip switch to activate either a narrow or wide notch window. When the display is blanked, two "N"s or three "W"s will appear on the screen. The N will indicate a narrow notch window and will be in the round tab and square tab portion of the graph segments. The wide notch window will cause a W to be in the round tab, square tab and zinc penny segments. These indications are an easy way to check what part of the scale is being notched out. The notch indicators will only show when there is no target under the coil. When there is a target signal, no matter if the target has been discriminated or not, the display will show the information of the target.

The Sum mode is another feature to help identify targets. While the detector is in either the Discriminate or All Metal mode, the display shows the target information from the entire sweep of the coil. Each time the coil passes over the target the microprocessor generates a new target ID reading. While this is nice for general searching, it can be confusing while pinpointing. This is where the Sum mode becomes useful. Pushing the springloaded switch into the Sum mode causes the detector to start a multi-tone ID and averages all of the coil passes over the target. The tone ID has nine different tones and relates directly to the bar graph segments. The higher up on the graph the target is, the higher the pitch of the audio signal. Averaging the coil passes over the target gives the detectorist the ability to get rid of most of the signal noise that prevents making an accurate target identification. Here's how it works: when the detectorist gets a target signal that he wishes to check out, he pushes and holds the Mode switch in the Sum position. Shortening his coil sweep to only a two or four inch sweep he passes the coil over the target three to seven times. The short multiple sweeps give the microprocessor the chance to sum the passes and average them. During the sweeps the audio ID will start at the lowest signal and will get progressively higher in pitch until there is no more change. When this happens the detector is giving the most accurate ID possible. Then the user can decide if he wants to dig or ignore the target.

All of these new features are complimented by Tesoro's easy to use controls. No touch pads or scroll through menus. Set the detector how you like it by adjusting the knobs on the front of the machine. The Cortés features an On/Off Sensitivity knob; a Discriminate Level knob; a Manual Ground Balance knob; a Mode Switch with All Metal, Discriminate and Sum mode settings; a Notch Width switch with Off, Narrow and Wide settings and a Light switch to control the LCD backlight with a High, Low, and Off positions.

The Cortés fits into a package that weighs just less than three pounds (including the batteries!) and is covered under Tesoro's Lifetime Warranty. The Tesoro Cortés makes target ID easy and fun. Contact your local dealer or the factory for more information.

SPECIFICATIONS
Operating Frequency 10 kHz
Searchcoil Type Concentric
Searchcoil Size 9 x 8
Searchcoil Family Epsilon
Cable Length Approx. 3'
Audio Freq. Target ID Tones Approx. 350 to 800 Hz
Audio Freq. All Metal VCO Approx. 350 to 920 Hz
Audio Output 2 ¼" speaker and headphone jack
Headphone Compatibility ¼" stereo plug
Weight (may vary slightly) 2.98 lbs
Battery Requirement Eight AA (alkaline)
Battery Life (typical) 10 to 20 hours
Optimum Temp. Range 30° to 100° F
Optimum Humidity 0 to 75% R.H.
Operating Modes Silent Search Discriminate
No Motion All Metal
Sum
Notch Narrow/Wide
GETTING STARTED - UNPACKING THE BOX

Your Cortés was shipped with these parts:

1 Upper Pole Assembly

Fully assembled, including upper pole stem with handle grip, padded arm bracket and control housing.

1 Middle Pole Assembly With Pole Lock

1 ABS Lower Pole Assembly

Fully assembled, complete with two friction washers, mounting screw, and thumb nut.

1 9 x 8 Concentric Searchcoil With 3’ Cable

2 Battery Packs, Each With 4 AA Batteries

1 Operator Instruction Manual

1 Tesoro Warranty Card

If any of these items are missing, contact the Tesoro Authorized Dealer where you purchased your detector immediately.

 

Assembling the Cortés is simple and requires no special tools. Just install the battery packs, mount the searchcoil on the lower pole assembly, connect the pole assemblies together, wrap the excess cable around the pole and plug the cable into the control housing. Finally, adjust the pole length and searchcoil angle and you're ready!


INSTALLING THE BATTERY

The Cortés is powered by 8 AA batteries divided into 2 compartments, which are located in the armrest housing.

Open the battery compartment under the armrest by gently grasping the bottom edge of the door and pulling outward and upwards. (The door is hinged at the top.)

 

Remove the batteries by pressing down on the right side of the 4-pack battery holder so that the left side of the holder will pop up. Pull out the holder and replace the batteries as needed.

When returning the holder, note the position of the spring clips inside the armrest housing and make sure that the battery pack contacts fit snugly against the springs. Insert the side with the contacts first and then press down on the left edge of the battery holder to reseat the holder.

Snap compartment cover to close.

ASSEMBLING YOUR DETECTOR
  1. On the lower pole assembly, remove the mounting screw and thumb nut from the pole tip.
  2. Insert the pole tip between the mounting ears of the searchcoil and align the holes of the pole tip and washers with those of the mounting ears.
    Note: The pole tip should fit very snugly into the mounting ears.
  3. Insert the mounting screw through the holes in the mounting ears and pole tip—entering from the side opposite the cable connection.
  4. Install the thumb nut on the mounting screw and tighten by hand. 
    Note: Do not overtighten the thumb nut. It should be snug but not too difficult to loosen up.
  5. On the middle pole assembly, depress the two spring buttons and slide the middle pole assembly into the upper pole assembly until the spring buttons click into the holes, thus locking the two assemblies into place. Tighten the pole lock to secure the two assemblies together.
  6. Slide lower pole into middle pole until the spring buttons click into the first set of adjustment holes. Turn pole lock to tighten, thus locking the assembly into place.
  7. Wrap the cable around the pole leaving enough slack near the searchcoil to permit searchcoil adjustment.
    Note: Do not allow the cable to flop loosely over the searchcoil. Since the detector is sensitive enough to “see” the tiny wires in the cable, a floppy cable can cause false signals as the searchcoil senses the moving wires.
  8. Plug the male cable end into the female connector on the control housing and tighten the cable thumb nut. You are finished!
    Note: You will want to adjust the pole length and the searchcoil angle to your preference.

ADJUSTING THE POLE & SEARCHCOIL

 

The pole length should be adjusted so that the detector does not become uncomfortable or tiring after long periods of use. The detector grip should rest in your hand with your arm relaxed, your elbow straight but not locked, with the pole extending out in front of you at the approximate angle shown in the photo.

You should be able to swing the detector back and forth in front of you—using relaxed shoulder movement—while keeping the searchcoil as close to the ground as possible. This swinging movement is often called a “sweep.”

The searchcoil should not touch the ground during your sweep. The pole length should be adjusted to allow this without having to lift the detector with your elbow or shoulder. The searchcoil should rest about one inch above the ground while you are standing erect. The angle of the searchcoil should allow the bottom to be parallel to the ground.

The pole length is adjusted by loosening the pole lock, then depressing the spring buttons and extending or shortening the pole until the spring buttons click into the set of holes that give you the most comfortable pole length.

To adjust the searchcoil angle, simply loosen the searchcoil thumb nut slightly and move the searchcoil into the desired position. Tighten the searchcoil thumb nut by hand so that the searchcoil will hold in place.

 


QUICKSTART - SELF-GUIDED TUTORIAL

The Quickstart is designed to teach you how to use your new Cortés. It provides a quick and easy means of learning your detector and the concepts behind all of the functions.

You will need the following items:

  1. Your fully assembled Cortés.
  2. An iron target (a small nail or screw will do), an iron washer, a nickel, a zinc penny (1982 or later), a quarter and a couple of different pull tabs.
  3. A nonmetal table top or counter.

Here’s what you will do:

  1. Check Display Readings in DISC Mode
  2. Adjust SENSITIVITY
  3. Perform Air Test in DISC Mode
  4. Perform Air Test in NOTCH Mode
  5. Perform Air Test in SUM Mode
  6. Adjust THRESHOLD
  7. Adjust GROUND BALANCE for Air Test
  8. Perform Air Test in ALL METAL Mode
  9. Check Back Light Levels
Prepare for the Quickstart

Place your assembled Cortés on the nonmetal surface. Make sure that there are no metal objects near the coil and remove any jewelry from your hands and wrists.

 

Start with the controls like this:

  1. THRESHOLD, SENSITIVITY and DISCRIMINATE LEVEL knobs turned completely counterclockwise.
  2. MODE, NOTCH and LIGHT switches in the center position.
  3. GROUND BALANCE knob in the 12 o’clock position.
Check Display Readings in DISC Mode

Turn the SENSITIVITY knob from OFF to about 2-3. You will hear a quick beep followed by a slight hum that will fade away. This is the detector letting you know that it has been turned on and is ready to go.

The Tesoro Cortés is a Target Identification Detector or T.I.D. The most important feature is the 2 by 16 character display found on the upper half of the detector faceplate. At this time the only thing that should be displayed on your screen is the battery level indicator in the lower right corner and the word DISCRIMINATE. The battery level is a continuous test of the condition of your battery. The indicator will read like a fuel gauge. As the batteries get lower, the bar dips lower. When the bar becomes very small, it is time to change your batteries.

 

Pass any target over the coil and read the meter. The information is unimportant at this moment. After about 6 to 10 seconds the screen will clear and the word DISCRIMINATE will appear again. The Cortés will clear the display screen after that amount of time so you will be able to visually see a target even if you do not get an audio response. You may want to take some time to try this out.

As you were waving the targets, you will have noticed that the display has several areas that contain different pieces of information. All of the different segments will be used together to determine the most likely identification of the target while it is still in the ground. As you are practicing, please note that different distances from the coil, orientation of the target, and width of the sweeps or passes over the coil may produce a variety of slightly distinct display readings.

NOTE: A target identification detector is never 100% accurate. If you get a strong, positive audio signal when hunting, dig it, no matter what the display shows. Digging the good audio/bad display target will result in better finds over the long run than ignoring those signals.

The top row of the display shows the target data in the broadest strokes. All targets will fall into one of four categories: Iron or Foil; Nickel, Pull Tab, Ring; Zinc Penny, Screw Cap; Silver Coin, Copper Penny. This brief information will lead you to the bottom row that contains much more detailed data.

Starting from the bottom left-hand corner of the display, you will find the COIN DEPTH indicator. This section will let you know the approximate depth of the target. In the center of the bottom row is a nine segment bar graph. It will show all of the information the detector saw during the entire coil sweep. Full sweep data information is helpful in determining possible treasure/trash masking and odd-shaped iron. Between the graph and the battery indicator is the ID NUMBER. The ID Number shows the peak part of the signal as a two digit number from 0 to 95. Iron reads as 0 and copper and silver coins read 95. All other targets will read somewhere in between. Take some time to try all of your targets and notice the different readings that you get. The best distance from the coil is somewhere between 4 and 8 inches. If you get closer, you will notice the detector will read LIFT COIL. Moving the target away from the coil slightly will result in a more accurate reading.

Below are some of the possible readings from various targets. These are not exact and your machine may read slightly different.

Small Iron Target (Screw or Nail): You may not get an audio signal depending on the target size and shape. However, you will get a meter reading.

 

Iron Washer or Odd-Shaped Iron: Odd-shaped iron or iron with holes in it can fool many machines. As it starts to pass under the coil, it may look like a coin. But as it nears the center of the coil, its signal shifts to the more traditional iron signal. Notice the two illustrations below. In the first, the top row reads iron or foil, the bar graph has some peaks in the coin range and the ID number reads 0. In the second, the top row reads zinc cent, screw cap, there is nothing in the bar graph and the ID number reads 88.

 

The thing that both of these illustrations have in common is that the various segments of the display do not "agree" with each other. This is a sure sign that you are detecting an odd-shaped piece of iron. Notice on the rest of the illustrations that the bar graph and the ID number show about the same information. When the ID number and the graph "agree," you can be sure that your Cortés is receiving a clean signal.

 

Adjust SENSITIVITY

The all metal circuit uses a single channel to detect various metals. The discriminate circuit uses two different channels, then amplifies and filters them. The detector will then compare the signals and determine whether or not to beep at the target. While there is a great advantage to ignoring unwanted targets, it can make the circuitry more susceptible to interference. A number of outside conditions such as power lines, highly mineralized soil, and wet salt sand can cause interference.

The SENSITIVITY knob is used to raise or lower the power to the operational amplifiers, which changes the gain. Gain is a measurement of how much a signal is amplified. The higher the gain the more depth and sensitivity to small objects a detector has. Unfortunately, any small interference that is amplified can cause the detector to become erratic. The SENSITIVITY control is used to find the best gain setting in any location without letting the detector become unstable.

The SENSITIVITY knob is numbered from MIN to 10 and then has an orange area called the Max Boost Zone. For normal hunting, anywhere in the numbered zone will work very well. However, the Max Boost will allow you to increase the power to the operational amplifiers to the point of overload. This may cause your detector to become unstable and force you to turn the SENSITIVITY knob to a lower setting. An overload situation will not hurt your detector, but it will maximize the gain that is used by your detector. This can, in certain conditions such as low mineralization in the soil, cause your detector to penetrate deeper into the ground and become more sensitive to small targets.

Take some time to try waving targets in front of the coil with different sensitivity settings. Notice that the higher the sensitivity setting, the farther away from the coil that a target can be and still respond with an audio signal.

Perform Air Test in DISC Mode

As discussed before, the Discriminate Mode is used to filter unwanted targets from good targets. The principle behind this is pretty simple. The detector sends out a signal and then receives it back creating a small electronic field. As metal passes through the field that the detector generates, it causes a change in the received signal. The amount of change that each type of metal causes is fairly constant; therefore, we can tune our detectors to miss targets that we don’t want to find. The change is based on the type of conductivity that each target has. The general list of conductive targets is as follows: iron, foil, nickels, gold jewelry, pull tabs, screw tabs, pennies and silver coins starting with dimes and working up to silver dollars. This is very easy to visualize using the bar graph. This list is meant to be a guide only. There is a point that some pull tabs, nickels and gold jewelry overlap. Also, the depth of the target and its orientation in the ground can change the received signal. A coin that is flat to the coil will produce a better signal than a coin that is on edge. Take some time to try different combinations of depths and orientation of your targets and find out how your detector responds.

We are now ready to discriminate targets from each other. We will start with the DISCRIMINATE LEVEL at MIN. Please notice that the DISCRIMINATE LEVEL knob has words that correspond to the items that are discriminated out. While performing the Air Test, notice that your Cortés will continue to display target data for items that do not respond with an audio signal.

All of your targets except the small iron should respond with a good audio signal at the MIN setting. Next, we will turn the DISCRIMINATE LEVEL up to the 5¢ setting. This level is high enough to knock out the nickel. At this time the iron target and the nickel should give no response, while most of the pull tabs, the zinc penny, and the quarter will give a solid response. The iron washer may fall out at some point or may give a choppy signal all the way up to MAX. But reading the display should give you the indication that it is odd-shaped iron. Next, turn the DISCRIMINATE LEVEL knob just past the PULL TAB marking. At this time most or all of the pull tabs should not give any audio signal. The zinc penny and the quarter should give a strong signal. Now roll the DISCRIMINATE LEVEL all the way to MAX. Notice that the penny has stopped responding and only the quarter is still responding. The discrimination will not go high enough to lose most of the silver coins.

This Air Test was designed to show you quickly how your Discriminate Mode works. Each machine may be a little different from all of the others, so you may want to take some time and try different targets to find responses of your machine. At a later date, you may want to build a test garden to test your detector in the field.

Perform Air Test in NOTCH Mode

There is a very distinct difference between the regular Discriminate and the Notch Filter Discriminate. While both filter out unwanted targets, the regular Discriminate Level knocks out everything below the level it was set at. The Notch Filter Discriminate works only in a certain band and does not affect the targets below or above it. This gives the detector the advantage of discriminating most of the pull tabs and still keeping nickels and gold rings. The Notch Filter Discriminate has two settings—Narrow and Wide. Narrow covers most pull tabs and Wide covers most pull tabs and most screw caps.

Turn the DISCRIMINATE LEVEL down to MIN. Please remember that the regular Discriminate will override the Notch Filter Discriminate. The best settings when using the Notch Filter Discriminate is to have the DISCRIMINATE LEVEL set just high enough to knock out small iron and foil and use the NOTCH switch to define the width of the Notch window.

Flip the NOTCH switch to either NAR. (Narrow) or WIDE. The N will indicate a narrow notch window and will be in the round tab and square tab portion of the graph segments. The wide notch window will cause a W to be in the round tab, square tab and zinc penny segments.

 

These indications are an easy way to check what part of the scale is being notched out. The notch indicators will only show when there is no target under the coil. When there is a target signal, no matter if the target has been discriminated or not, the display will show the information of the target. Take some time to try various targets and note the response. When you are done, flip the NOTCH switch back into the center position before moving to the next section of the quick start.

NOTE: No detector can guarantee to discriminate out all of the pull tabs and respond to all of the gold rings. The Cortés has two different notch positions to knock out the most common trash targets. Only the user can determine the right amount of Notch Filter Discrimination that is correct for his/her hunting style and local environment.

Perform Air Test in SUM Mode

The Sum Mode is a feature that can help identify targets. While the detector is in either the Discriminate or All Metal Mode, the display shows the target information from the entire sweep of the coil. Each time the coil passes over the target, the microprocessor generates a new target ID reading. While this is nice for general searching, it can be confusing while pinpointing. This is where the Sum Mode becomes useful. Pushing the springloaded switch into the Sum Mode causes the detector to start a multi-tone ID and averages all of the coil passes over the target. The tone ID has nine different tones and relates directly to the bar graph segments. The higher up on the graph the target is, the higher the pitch of the audio signal. Averaging the coil passes over the target gives the detectorist the ability to get rid of most of the signal noise that prevents making an accurate target identification.

 

Start by waving targets across both the outer and inner rings of your 9x8 coil. Notice that you are hearing a single frequency audio tone and that the display may change. Now push the MODE Switch to the SUM position and let go. The switch should spring back to the center position. The SUM Mode is a momentary position only. In the SUM Mode, you will want to shorten your coil sweep down to about 2" to 4". You will be able to duplicate this by waving your target over the inner ring of your 9x8 coil only. Shortening the coil sweep helps to eliminate unwanted ground noise in the field.

Now push and hold the MODE Switch into the SUM position. As you wave your targets, you will notice the audio signal starts out with a low tone and will shift as the Cortés averages the coil sweeps. After 4 to 7 sweeps, the tone should stop shifting and the display will show the most accurate data available.

Take some time to check all of your targets and notice the different tones and practice shortening your target sweeps.

Adjust Threshold

Flip the MODE Switch to the farthest right-hand position. This will put your Cortés into the ALL METAL Mode. The All Metal Mode is used to help pinpoint and handle highly mineralized ground. The Cortés uses a factory preset ground balance in the DISCRIMINATE Mode. This will work fine for most hunting conditions, but some areas may have a high enough mineral content to cause a loss of depth and sensitivity. The ALL METAL Mode and its adjustable ground balance was designed to allow you to work in those tougher conditions.

 

To adjust the threshold tone, turn the THRESHOLD knob clockwise until you hear a slight but steady tone. You will have to turn the knob to somewhere between the 10 o’clock and 1 o’clock position to get the best hum.

The purpose of the threshold tone is to give a reference to judge targets for pinpointing and to adjust the ground balance. (For more information on ground balancing, see the "Adjust GROUND BALANCE for Air Test" section below and the "Ground Balancing in the Field" section.)

In the field, some targets may be small enough or deep enough that they will not be able to generate an audio signal by themselves. By monitoring a threshold tone, you already have a threshold tone so changes are easier to hear. However, if the threshold is set too soft or too loud, small changes in the signal will be hard to hear. Take some time and find a threshold level that is right for you.

Adjust GROUND BALANCE for Air Test

The ground balance function for your Cortés is a form of discrimination that allows you to tune out the mineralization in the ground that may mask targets or decrease the detector's depth and sensitivity. The GROUND BALANCE knob is on a 3 and ¾ turn potentiometer. While the knob will turn endlessly in either direction, when the knob is at the end of its range, a slight drag will be felt while turning.

NOTE: The following procedure is for the Air Test only. For directions on ground balancing your Cortés in the field, see the "Ground Balancing in the Field" section.

To set the GROUND BALANCE knob for the Air Test, turn the knob 5 turns counterclockwise and then turn the knob 2 turns clockwise. This will make sure the GROUND BALANCE knob is just slightly above the middle part of its range. No further turns will be needed for the Air Test.

Perform Air Test in ALL METAL Mode

Once you have set the correct threshold hum and adjusted the ground balance, you are ready to perform an Air Test in the ALL METAL Mode. Your Cortés has a VCO-style ALL METAL Mode. You will find that as targets get closer to the coil, the threshold tone will get louder and higher in pitch.

Try waving your targets in front of the coil. Start from a distance of 10 to 12 inches away from the coil and slowly work your way closer to the coil. Then try starting from 6 inches away from the left or right of your coil and work your way to the center of the coil. Notice the changes of the audio signal.

 

Your strongest signal will always be closest to the center of the coil. Additional information can also be learned by the signal strength and pitch. A smaller or deeper target will give a less noticeable change in the threshold than a larger or more shallow target will give. Take some time and try all of your targets at different depths to find out how your detector sounds.

Check Back Light Levels

The Cortés has a back lighting system so that you will be able to hunt in darkened conditions. To check the back light levels, shade the display with your cupped hand or turn down the light in the room that you are in. Flip the LIGHT switch from the center position to either the LOW or HIGH position. You should see the display light up. Make sure that you return the LIGHT switch to the center position when you are done using the back light.

NOTE: Using the LIGHT feature will cause your batteries to drain much faster than during regular use. The Low Level draws less current than the High and will not drain your batteries as quickly.

Conclusion

Congratulations, you have just finished the Quickstart for your new Cortés detector and in the process have learned quite a lot about your detector. But experience is the best teacher. I would recommend that you get out and practice with your detector as much as possible. Any time spent using your detector will give you valuable experience.

OPERATING TECHNIQUES

Ground Balancing In The Field

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